Santiago – in Pictures

After Peru, Chile was a shock to the system. It was so cold that I took a salsa class just to keep warm. Another tactic was to keep walking…

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Student protest. The tear gas and water cannon made me walk faster. Despite the streaming eyes, a good result.

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View of Santiago from Cerro San Cristóbal.

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‘Chile Before Chile’ exhibition at the Museo Chileno de Arte Precolombino.

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Spotted at one of the university buildings. This is a city where you have to keep looking up. You might miss something.

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I wouldn’t think of visiting the Cementario General, but I’m glad I did. The architecture is stunning. I was accompanying a friend who was a clown – strange but true. There are special areas where people are buried according to their profession and her fellow payasos had a mausoleum in the shape of a Big Top.

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Ricardo Mesa’s raised fists door handles at the Gabriela Mistral Centre. I was told they were turned upside down during Pinochet’s military rule.

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There are stray dogs everywhere. Apparently, over 2,000,000 in Santiago. They’ll happily follow you from A to B – I even saw them running around with the protestors and the police. Some of them look quite healthy and have doggy coats because people look after them.

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This isn’t a wardrobe – it’s a lavatory. Who knew that Narnia was at a restaurant in Santiago? Peluquería Francesca is worth a visit just to check out the quirky antique interior. A good hot chocolate too, on a cold day.

Next stop – New Zealand.

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Hats of Peru

More ladies than men seem to wear them – perhaps for modesty, perhaps it reflects the region where they’re from. That aside, if you’re not keeping the sun off here, you’re having to keep warm – often in the same day …

TOP HAT:

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Older ladies seem to wear these. Fancy.

BOWLER:

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If it’s good enough for a London City Gent, it’s good enough for a Cusco City Lady.

PANAMA:

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An Ecuadorian influence perhaps.

FLAT:

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They create a lot of shade. Baby Alpaca is optional.

FLOPPY:

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All the children (and some parents) wear these. A bit like Paddington Bear.

CHULLO:

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They look cool on the slopes, but you saw them here first.

Mystery and Majesty

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“Urubam, Urubam, Urubamba!” Shouted the driver. I’d just arrived in Peru and decided to spend a few days up in the Andes. I wedged myself between a man balancing a child on his knees and a woman sucking the life out of an orange. I suddenly caught the driver taking my rucksack and putting it on the roof. I decided to get out and supervise. “It’s OK!” he shouted, “Safe!” I handed him my chain lock just in case. As we made our way through the Sacred Valley, the mental images I had of Peru suddenly came to life – snow capped mountains, women carrying children in their mantas and even the odd alpaca.

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Once we arrived in Urubamba, I found myself in the middle of the Señor de Torrechayoc festival. Hundreds of people were parading through the streets carrying an image of Christ. Apparently, it celebrates a time when travellers in the town experienced weird dreams near the site of a cross.

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I wondered if that was why some of the dancers wore weird masks. The festivities lasted for days but my dreams were no stranger than normal.

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In the morning, I’d walk into town and go to the market. It had the best tomatoes and avocados I’ve ever tasted. I turned down the guinea pig.

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The women here are fit. I don’t know how they carry their children and their groceries up those hills. The altitude made me feel like there was an elephant sitting on my chest, but it was good preparation for what came next.

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What little breath I had, was taken away at this point. Hidden high in the mountains, Machu Picchu is mysterious and majestic. The questions about why this city was designed with such definitude are only replaced by more questions about how it was all achieved.

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Can you make out the condor with its open wings on the rocks behind it? This temple represents the ‘upper world’ inhabited by superior gods. It’s thought the head may have been used as a sacrificial altar.

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These reflecting pools were used to watch the sun and the moon.

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It was then time to spend a few days in the historic capital of the Inca Empire. I wasn’t expecting to see a Starbucks and a McDonald’s in Cusco, but I suppose that’s a positive side of being in a busy travellers’ hub – there are places that have treats. And when I say treats, I also mean fresh green vegetables. I made up for lost time in the cafes around Plaza de Armas and San Blas. The odd salad, milkshake and cake may have been scoffed more than once at places like Green Point, Cafe Morena and Jack’s Cafe. (By the way, Green Point does a brilliant four course lunch for just S10.00 / £2).

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For the more traditional side of Cusco I went to San Pedro Market. You can by-bass the tourist gifts and go where the locals go. There are lines of stalls making any kind of juice that you want …

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… or any kind of food that you want. All of it fresh and all of it local.
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Is there anything cuter than this? It was one of many parades in the city. I picked the right month. June is apparently Cusco’s anniversary month and all these events lead up to the Festival of the Sun.

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I wish I could have stayed on to experience it. Peru is such a beautiful and mystical place and I only saw a small part of it. Next stop – Chile.

Surprises – Good and Bad

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This is the man I came to see – President Rafael Correa. Whilst in Quito, I was told that he always comes out onto his balcony for the Changing of the Guard ceremony. What surprised me, was the response.

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Hundreds of people were waving flags and shouting, “Viva Ecuador!” The national anthem then started up. Not surprisingly, I didn’t recognise the tune and the older woman standing next to me took the cap off my head and told me to show some respect.

Minutes later, this happened:

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Ecuador’s World Cup football squad arrived. Hundreds more packed into the Plaza Grande to cheer them on. The atmosphere was fantastic. I tried to work my way through the crowds to get a better view, “Let her through” I heard someone say. People do make you feel welcome here. The day before, I went into a shop to ask for directions and the woman gave me her telephone number just in case I got lost.

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Quito is a UNESCO World Heritage site. It’s a beautiful city to walk around. I got a great view from the Vista Hermosa restaurant one night where I tried Canelazo for the first time – an alcoholic drink served in a teapot. What’s not to like?

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The Virgin of Quito can be spotted from most parts of the centro histórico, which is a great place to explore on a Sunday when the streets are closed to traffic. I was drawn towards the gold interior of la Compañía and found that a classical concert was about to start. It was the longest time I’d ever spent in a church.

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Another nice surprise was being invited up to Mindo by some friends I’d made on the road. The town is located in the foothills of the Andes, about a two hour drive from Quito. It was beautiful. I hiked up to the Cascada Reina and felt like I had the entire canopy to myself. Maybe this was why:

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Getting to the waterfalls involves a ride in a cable car high above the treetops. I say cable car, but it’s basically a platform on a pully. It’s not for the faint-hearted. When the attendant dropped me off he said, “Just kick the cable when you’re ready and we’ll know to come and get you.”

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The antidote was a visit I made to a local chocolate factory. They take you through the whole process from fermenting to tempering. Obviously, the best part was the tasting. We tried a 100% cocoa liquid and gradually added sugar to make it more palatable, then some nibs, ginger syrup and even a barbecue sauce. Chocolate is used a lot in the meat dishes here.

After the hustle and bustle of Quito, Mindo was a really relaxing place. This was my favourite spot:

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With good surprises, come bad ones. I’d planned and prepared for credit card fraud on this trip, but I wasn’t expecting it to be inside a bank, during a face to face transaction. But – I prefer to leave Ecuador remembering the kindness of others. One driver I got to know dropped me off at the airport. He gave me a big hug and said “Goodbye my friend!” With any luck, the investigation will be dealt with quickly. The nice surprises will stay with me forever.

Island Hopping in the Galápagos

image For somebody who get’s seasick, it was an ambitious task – taking photographs whilst sailing around an archipelago. In a quiet moment, I wept into my lifejacket.

But it was the Galápagos Islands and I’d wanted to go there since I was a little girl. Here’s why:

image When you meet a giant tortoise, it’s very clear who’s in charge. As they plod down the path, you soon realise you’re in their way. If you accidentally get too close, they hiss at you. It takes you by surprise, especially when they’re hiding at the side of the road. This picture was taken on Santa Cruz. I was told that the females here walk 15km down to the sea to lay their eggs.

image This tortoise on Isabela was one of many rescued by helicopter when the Cerro Azul volcano erupted in 1998. It’s housed at a local breeding centre. They’re trying to get the numbers back up and successfully bred 200 in the first couple of years. The new generation have gradually been released back into the wild. image With their funny little dance and bright blue feet, you can understand why the blue-footed booby is a star attraction on the Galápagos. I spotted this one at Academy Bay. Conservationists here say the population has decreased by two thirds since the early ’90s. They believe it’s partly due to overfishing in Peruvian waters.

image As you wouldn’t expect tortoises to give you the right of way, don’t expect sea lions to give up their seat for you either. Here at San Cristóbal I learned just how cheeky they can be. After finishing the vounteer project, I went down to La Lobearía for an early morning swim. Suddenly, a sea lion pup popped up next to me as if to ask, “What are you doing here?” He then started to roll around in the water. He did it a few times and I copied him. His Mum then appeared, which made me a little nervous, but we played for a short while and the two of them swam off.

image They’re usually the first thing you see when you arrive at any of the islands – a wonderful welcome party. Sadly, the El Ninos in 1988 and 1998 have had a drastic affect on their numbers. Conservationists say about half the population was lost and has yet to recover.

image The Galápagos penguin has also been affected by weather events. The species is endangered – there are now fewer than 2000 living on the islands. That matters, because they’re the only penguins who live north of the equator. I found these ones at Floreana. I was surprised by how small they were – about 49cm long.

image Charles Darwin described marine iguanas as ‘hideous-looking creatures, of a dirty black colour, stupid and sluggish in their movements’.

image This little family at Santa Cruz certainly look quite sinister, don’t they! Their white faces look ghostly. At Las Tintoreras, they were overtaking me in the water. It seemed strange to see these reptiles swim.

image I came across yellow land iguanas on a hike up to the Sierra Negra volcano on Isabela. Pink ones live in the northern part of the island, but the area is closed to travellers.

image I love these Sally Lightfoot crabs. You can spot them out at sea because their red shells are so bright against the black rocks.

imageThey crawl all over the marine iguanas, who don’t seem to mind.

image I was so busy watching the wildlife, that I almost forgot about the beaches. This is Tortuga Bay, about an hour’s walk from the harbour at Santa Cruz. It was a great place to relax. There were more iguanas sunbathing, than people.

image Getting from one island to the other is easy to do. There are plenty of tour companies around the harbours who sell tickets. Some of them offer last minute deals. The average price is about $100. Allow yourself time for the authorities to search and tag your bag – they need to check that nothing organic is transferred from one island to the other. Theoretically, once sealed, you can’t get anything out. If you do have to break in, make sure you keep your tag to show them at the other side. It’s best to put a rain cover over your bag, because it will get wet on board.

image Once on the islands, you can find these white taxis everywhere and they’re inexpensive. The most I paid to get to a local hotel was $2.

image I was very sad to leave the Galápagos. One day, there’ll be a tablet strong enough for me to enjoy the manta rays and dolphins out at sea, instead of quietly acknowledging them out of the corner of my eye!